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Bloomberg vs. CNBC – Which One Do You Prefer?

By JLP | August 31, 2007

First off, I don’t normally watch financial TV. Why? Because it’s too noisy and there’s so much conflicting information that I think it does nothing but confuse people. That said, this week I was flipping through the channels and decided to check out Bloomberg TV. Believe it or not, I had never watched Bloomberg TV until this week.

I like it! In my opinion, it’s more laid back and informative than CNBC. I particularly like Open Exchange with Pimm Fox, which I highlighted earlier this week.

But, that’s just my opinion. I’d like to know what you think.

Do you watch financial TV? If so, which one do you watch and why?

Topics: Question of the Day | 21 Comments »


21 Responses to “Bloomberg vs. CNBC – Which One Do You Prefer?”

  1. John Forman Says:
    August 31st, 2007 at 1:40 pm

    It’s actually kind of funny, but for as far back as I can remember at the office (I’m a market analyst) we have always had CNBC on. A couple months back, though, we had some strange signal problems with CNBC and as a result we tuned in to Bloomberg. I think we were all quite impressed. As a result, we now have both on. The one that actually has the volume turned up depends on which one is running the more interesting content. The one thing I’ve found is that Bloomberg’s interviews tend be longer, and therefor more informative. I’ve always found the CNBC ones being cut off too quickly.

  2. HC Says:
    August 31st, 2007 at 2:08 pm

    I don’t have extended cable, so I watch Nightly Business Report on PBS.

    It’s obviously edited to half-hour standards, but they’ll occasionally do a feature and spread it over several days, which gives it a bit more depth.

  3. Cindy Says:
    August 31st, 2007 at 6:15 pm

    I also watch the Nightly Business Report, and frequently I catch On The Money on CNBC.

    Both are interesting wrap-ups I find that I learn something new quite frequently… at the very least a term or company or fund that I look up. I figure it adds a piece to my financial education. What makes me happy is that I feel like I’m finally knowledgeable enough to watch critically and be able to separate the wheat from the chaff.

  4. thomas Says:
    September 1st, 2007 at 1:37 pm

    I watch CNBC (don’t have bloomberg). I’m on the west coast, and I wake up to my TV with CNBC just as the opening bell goes off. I would give Bloomberg a try if available.

  5. MossySF Says:
    September 7th, 2007 at 3:42 am

    I watched CNBC a few times – it’s like a damn pre-game/post-game football show.

  6. Roger Says:
    October 10th, 2007 at 4:15 pm

    Hi, I was tired of the emotional cheerleading and political bias on CNBC. Out of frustration, I tried Bloomberg and was pleasantly surprised. They report financial news and events without any emotional, political rhetoric. That, to me, is professional journalism.

  7. triko-hirko Says:
    October 21st, 2007 at 2:06 am

    Bloomberg very professional, very informative.

    I used to watch CNBC, years back but it became too much of a reality show, too much noise, screams, boob flashings and rudeness.

  8. kevin Says:
    February 7th, 2008 at 8:28 am

    I left CNBC for Bloomberg. CNBC became noisy, rude, and full of opinions and people with agendas. Bloomberg reports the news and gives the important information while leaving out the crap.

  9. Bill's Says:
    May 21st, 2008 at 2:58 pm

    i think CNBC have the quality of American expression over the international less people want to listen, but what in the Bloomberg are more welcome among the student and professional widespread world. i watch bloomberg because they more persuasive for people doing bussiness, i improve a lot by watch bloomberg. i think they should bring the record to university research for political economy, one thing for sure not all student have cable to observe ????

  10. JT Says:
    January 2nd, 2009 at 4:35 am

    Dillan Ratigan and a ton of commentors make the news with their opinions vs reporting the news. Talking to an investment professional, he mentioned “CNBC” is financial pornography. You can see this when they have 10 people talking at one time on a specific topic. Bloomberg (although I am not a fan of their DOS like terminal) definitely takes out of the noise and emotion in delivering the news.

  11. Ron Says:
    January 27th, 2009 at 11:04 am

    I prefer CNBC because it seems to be more balanced in it’s coverage dedicating significant air time to european market coverage including the closing bell of the european exchanges. Bloomberg only gives a fleeting glimpse on the
    European markets and stocks unless it is a major story eg RBS near nationalisation.
    Also Presenter-wise I’m locked in my admiration of
    Erin Burnett (CNBC)
    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_jQy9dFVbxHw/SJnplnyuG5I/AAAAAAAABTI/74J9A_RalmU/s400/girlscnbc2.jpg

  12. Ron Says:
    January 27th, 2009 at 11:12 am

    … Oh and Melissa Francis (CNBC)
    and little house on the prairie. – Beat that Bloomberg !

  13. Joe Says:
    March 13th, 2009 at 12:17 pm

    Bloomberg reports. CNBC give rants and opinions. Bloomberg seems more like they try to stay objective versus CNBC which has regular and frequent opinion mixed in. It confuses many as to what is news and what is opinion. Also all of the crazy pops, zips, and whooshes (sound effects and sensational graphics) on CNBC are mentally tiring and detract from the presentation.

  14. David Potts Says:
    April 16th, 2009 at 6:21 am

    I much prefer Bloomberg. I find CNBC rather annoying. They often gear their shows towards the retail investor.

    Furthermore, they show sport on a weekend and poker on an evening. Financial news should be financial news. If I want to watch sport then I can flip to a sports channel!

  15. linda leven Says:
    April 16th, 2009 at 7:58 pm

    CNBC HAS BECOME MORE ENTERTAINMENT THAN BUSINESS NEWS REPORTING. I USED TO WATCH THEM EXCLUSIVELY, BUT ITS BECOME A CIRCUS WITH TOO MANY SCREAMING AT ONCE. I AM TIRED OF THEIR IN-FIGHTING AND SNIDE REMARKS AND CYNICAL ATTITUDES. YET, BLOOMBERG IS RATHER DRY AND DULL, AND FOX IS SO BIASED, RIGHT WING. I KIND OF SWITCH BETWEEN ALL THREE NOW.

  16. mike Says:
    April 27th, 2009 at 9:34 am

    Yes Bloomberg is better. I start waching Bloomberg 2 nweeks ago.I watch cnbc for 2 1/2 years,but not anymore.75% is entertainment.

  17. Chuma Mgolodelwa Says:
    August 7th, 2009 at 7:24 am

    I fully support Bloomberg. Cnbc is noisy, lacks substance in their interviews because they speed through everything. They tend to focus too much on retail investors. As much as the shouting between reporters during squawk box can create an interesting debate, it does confuse facts with opinion. Bloomberg on the other hand is dull but very informative due to longer interviews. I like the structure of their programs, you can never confuse political capital from venture or for the record. And oh they never never have none financial programs like sport of poker unlike cnbc. By the way I am in south africa and I know more about the financial state of other countries through bloomberg.

  18. tony lucas Says:
    August 7th, 2009 at 10:11 am

    i have recently switched to bloomberg over cnbc as they seem to be less emotional and less bias. they report “the news” with a middle of the road position unlike cnbc which is always blowing smoke and creating smoking mirrors. However i do love Rick Santelli, he gives it to you like it is, good or bad.

  19. Vivek Says:
    August 17th, 2009 at 2:08 pm

    if we were to spot one differentiator of bloomberg over cnbc…what will that be, i am studying the brand perceptions of both media vehicles

  20. mike Says:
    October 30th, 2009 at 9:55 am

    Bloomberg for the win!

  21. Jack Says:
    February 23rd, 2010 at 6:24 am

    sure for bloomberg!

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