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Longtime readers of AFM know that I’m not a fan of misleading people. I don’t publish paid blog posts without a disclaimer stating that the post is an advertisement. Advertisers don’t care for that, but I think it is the right thing to do.

That said…

I read a short piece by Sapna Maheshwari in yesterday’s Houston Chronicle about how celebrities are advertising to their followers. The problem is that the postings usually don’t specify that they are advertisements. Rather, they come across as testimonials.

The reasons for this are simple: the money is huge!

The article states, “Captiv8, a company that connects brands to influencers, says someone with 3 million to 7 million followers can charge, on average, $187,500 for a post on YouTube, $75,000 for a post on Instagram or Snap-chat and $30,000 for a post on Twitter. For influencers with 50,000 to 500,000 followers, the average is $2,500 for YouTube, $1,000 for Instagram or Snapchat and $400 for Twitter.”

I would hope that people aren’t so naive to believe that celebrities—excuse me, I mean influencers—aren’t getting paid for some of their postings. I have always assumed they were.

From an article I read in today’s Houston Chronicle:

“Parents expect to spend an average of $673.57 on electronics, clothes and notebooks this year, compared with $630.36 last year, according to the National Retail Federation, an industry trade group. In total, parents of kindergarten through 12th-grade students say they will spend $27.3 billion on school supplies this year, up from $18.4 billion in 2007.”

We have one daughter still living at home. We probably spent around that average. One surprise large purchase we had to make this year was a TI NSpire CX calculator, which set us back around $120. As long as she doesn’t lose it, she should be able to use it through college.

How much did you spend on back to school?

I saw this video circulating on Facebook.

With all the negative stuff going on in the world, it’s nice to come across something positive. This young man reminds me of my boys. Check this out:

Well, it happened…

All the useful features of Yahoo! Finance have been thrown out the window in the latest “update”. I’m starting to think that “update” is code for “take away features”.

Yahoo! Finance was my right hand. It’s like it’s been cut off.

Sad…

UPDATE: Here is Yahoo’s announcement of the changes.

I Like This Judge

July 17, 2016

I saw this video this morning on facebook and thought it was worth sharing:

For the first time ever, I am making available the S&P 500 Monthly Total Returns going back to 1926.

I originally put this together years ago and have been religiously updating the information each month for the last ten years or so (what a life I have, right?).

My numbers vary slightly from the numbers found in the Ibbotson Year Book. I think the difference is due to rounding. My numbers come from percentages rounded to the nearest .00.

Anyway, I hope AFM readers find this helpful.

According to the latest Vanguard “How People Save” report, the average 401(K) balance is $96,000, while the median account balance is $26,405 (median age of participant is 46).

This does not bode well for the future of America’s retirees.

“Experts” suggest saving at least 10% of income. If you can’t do that, you should save as much as you can and increase it 1% per year until you hit your goal.

My advice: START AS SOON AS YOU CAN! The one thing you can never get back is time.