Archives For Investing

This is the last installment of S&P 500 Index Rolling Returns series.

The average 30-year rolling total return for the S&P 500 starting with 1926, is 2,478% or 11.21% annualized (geometric mean). There were several 30-year periods that had annual returns between 8% and 10%. Also, these numbers are not adjusted for the CPI, which would have a significant negative impact on the end results (perhaps another AFM series?).

Here are links to the other posts in this series:
S&P 500 Annual Returns 1926 – November 2015
S&P 500 5-Year Rolling Total Returns
S&P 500 10-Year Rolling Total Returns
S&P 500 20-Year Rolling Total Returns

Here are the 10-Year Rolling Total Returns for the S&P 500. Once again, these returns are not adjusted for the CPI, but DO include dividends.

Click here if the spreadsheet fails to load.

At the request of an AFM reader, I will be posting a series of spreadsheets of rolling total returns for the S&P 500 Index. Please note that these returns do not include an adjustment for the CPI.

Click here if you can’t see the spreadsheet.

I haven’t posted this information in awhile. I’m trying something new with this post by actually embedding an Excel Spreadsheet into this blog post. We’ll see how it works. I’m a tad excited about the possibilities of this.

The cool thing about it for AFM readers (you) is that you can copy and paste this information or you might even be able to save the spreadsheet for future use.

NOTE: One thing I noticed is there appears to be a lag in the loading of the spreadsheet, which is a tad annoying.

NOTE 2: I also noticed that the spreadsheet shows up in Safari on my iPad, but not my iPhone.

Click here if for for some reason you can’t see the spreadsheet.

The DJIA closed at 300 on December 31, 1928. It took nearly 26 years for it to reach the 400 threshold!

Once it reached 1,000 in late 1972, it “only” took about 14 years to reach 2,000.

It’s important to note that these are price return numbers and not total returns. That means they do not include dividends.

Here are the other thresholds throughout the years.


Table Properties


Dow Jones Industrial Average Threshold History

Closing
Threshold
Date
Closing
Threshold
Reached
Trading
Days
Between
Thresholds
Calendar
Days
Between
Thresholds
300 12/31/1928    
400 12/29/1954 6,494 9,494
500 3/12/1956 303 439
600 2/20/1959 742 1,075
700 5/17/1961 564 817
800 2/28/1964 699 1,017
900 1/28/1965 231 335
1000 11/14/1972 1,940 2,847
2000 1/8/1987 3,573 5,168
3000 4/17/1991 1,080 1,560
4000 2/23/1995 975 1,408
5000 11/21/1995 189 271
6000 10/14/1996 226 328
7000 2/13/1997 85 122
8000 7/16/1997 105 153
9000 4/6/1998 182 264
10000 3/29/1999 246 357
11000 5/3/1999 24 35
12000 10/19/2006 1,879 2,726
13000 4/25/2007 127 188
14000 7/19/2007 59 85
15000 5/7/2013 1,460 2,119
16000 11/21/2013 139 198
17000 7/3/2014 153 224
18000 12/23/2014 120 173

Here’s something for Throwback Thursday…

DJIA Peak to Peak (1987 - 1989)

The Dow Jones Industrial Average had a closing peak in 1987 of 2,722 on August 25. It didn’t close that high again until nearly two years later on August 24, 1989. I was just a kid back then. I graduated from high school in 1988 and although I was into the stock market and business, I didn’t realize that it took that long for it to get back to 2,700.

I can sum up August 2015’s market performance for you in one word:

NASTY!

In the eight indexes I follow (plus crude and oil), only two were up during August: crude oil and gold.

The S&P 500 Index—the index I follow most closely and have the most data on—was down 6.03%. That was its worst August performance since 2002.

Year-to-date, everything is down except the Barclay’s Aggregate Bond Index.

You can see the results for yourself by downloading the latest PDF: S&P 500, MidCap 400, SmallCap 600, & 1500 Performance History (01-2011 – 08-2015)