About JLP

The History of Me, JLP

I was born in Wichita, KS in 1969. I grew up in Valley Center, KS, which is a town about 10 miles north of Wichita. I graduated from high school in 1988 and started college at Wichita State University for the fall 1988 semester. I worked full-time and went to school part-time so it took me forever to get through school.

I met my wife at a church convention in Keystone, CO in 1991 (Sept. 26 to be exact). She was from Texas. After we each got back home, we wrote letters back and forth. I met her family in Dallas for Thanksgiving in 1991 and she came to visit my family in January 1992. I then spent Spring Break week with her and while I was visiting, I went and talked to the dean of the business school. I came back to visit in May of that year. At the time a grocery chain had just purchased another grocery chain and they were trying to fill a bunch of positions. I went and applied and got a job. I went back home to Kansas and told my mom and dad that I was moving to Texas. They were shocked! Their oldest son was leaving home. They tried to talk me out of it but they knew that I was in love and they both really liked my wife.

So, in the mid part of June 1992, I packed up my 1988 Buick Skyhawk and headed to Texas. I lived in a hellhole of an apartment the first year. It was horrible but I did it for love. On August 14, 1993, my wife and I were married. It is hard to believe that it was over 12 years ago.

After we were married, I returned to college. I had sat out a full year in order to establish Texas residency in order to get out of paying out-of-state tuition. I was working full-time in the grocery business and going to school part-time. My wife was majoring in Chemical Engineering and had a full scholarship all the way through. That was a huge blessing for our finances. She also co-oped (I believe that’s how you spell it) at some of the local plants. She made more in one semester than I did in a whole freakin’ year!

About a year and a half after we were married, we found out that we were expecting our oldest son. My wife was 6 months pregnant when she graduated from college. Mysteriously, no companies were interested in hiring her at the time. She had the baby in September and then in November, a local contracting company hired her and put her in one of the local plants. I then officially retired from the grocery business and began going to school full-time, while my mother-in-law watched our son. My wife was given a permanent position with the firm she was contracting in so she left the contracting business in May 1996.

Our oldest son was barely 9 months old when we found out we were expecting our second son. SURPRISE! My wife’s second pregnancy is a story all its own. Let me just say that our second son is on this earth because God wants him here! (I know that’s true for all of us, but I really emphasize it with my second son because of the all the troubles we had trying to have him.) I finished up college with a finance degree in December 1996. I then interviewed and took a position with PaineWebber (now UBS). I left PaineWebber after about a year and went to work for my father-in-law’s insurance company selling an employee benefit plan for mechanics (long story). I left my father-in-law’s company in the early 2000’s to go out on my own.

In hindsight, I probably should have gone to work for Charles Schwab. The reason I didn’t is because there are no Charles Schwab branches in the town we live in. We would have had to move to Houston or Dallas, which would have meant that my wife would have had to quit her job.

In 2004 our daughter was born.

UPDATED on April 20, 2009

14 responses to About JLP

  1. Did you really mean to say higher when referring to employement? Wouldn’t it be hired?

  2. Wow!
    You’ve worked very hard to obtain what you’ve achieved – congratulations are due.
    Good luck growing your foundation. It sounds very exciting.
    Making Our Way

    PS I’d be grateful if you visited my blogand let me know what you think of it. I’d be double grateful if you were interested in swapping links.

  3. We are a startup company and we recently launched our website http://www.iStockAnalyst.com. The core purpose of this website is to host competitions to bring out analysts for our other site http://www.goodstockideas.com. The other features of this website are chat rooms, research data, cumulative sentiment tracking, write to SEC or management, and unique overlapping charting.

    The purpose of this email is to invite you to register with the website. We would like you to join our writers’ team and write small articles to be published on the site and/or to various newswires services. If you are interested in becoming a stock analyst, we would invite you to participate in our competition and run a portfolio showing substantial profits. You will be able to keep 80% of the revenue generated from subscription to your research service. We will advertise for our analyst as required to bring in more subscribers.

  4. Has anyone ever looked into Gorillatrades.com? They have a nice advertising and marketing campaign and a nice web site, but it turns out their stock picking is really terrible. I wasted three months turning trades, paying a lot of commisssions and paying the Gorilla’s heft subscription fees only to loose money on their stock picks. And this was during a period when the S&P was up over 3.6% in just three months. No wonder they never mention their net returns. Seems to me its just a guy trying to get rich from subscription fees since he cant do so picking stocks. MY advice, dont waste your time and money. See http://www.baboontrades.com for more information… Mike

  5. Way to go! You have launched an effective blogsite. I am a retired financial consultant and investment broker who is trying to help folks find some outstanding investment mentors.
    Let’s consider affiliating our blogs? My blog address is
    http://investingmentor.blogspot.com/ If you are as sincere and
    honest as you come across, we can combine our efforts to help people without any conflicts of interest or hidden agendas.
    Perhaps you’d be so kind as to give me your opinion about our blog and any suggestions as to how to improve it. You are obviously a family man, and we are family-oriented. We are also fiercely independent and follow mentors who are too.
    Looking forward to your response. Marc

  6. I don’t know if this is the place but I have started researching for the advise you have presented in all of this. I have been reading a lot of your articals and am confident enought to ask you where I need to start?
    I am 55 and am going back into agriculture and I will have a little over $2mil, from the sell of some property, to invest within the next 6 months. I have been told that investing all of it and borrowing the money I need to set up my family, property, home and livestock would return me more money than paying out the $600,000 to $700,000 I need and investing the rest. Am I thinking right?
    I have more reading to learn how to choose a adviser. I just wanted to know where to start.

  7. oooh i worked at Charles Schwab…had an interesting time.

  8. Hi,
    This is a silly question, but I am never able to read the whole article when I am on your website. I really enjoy Jonathan Clements and can’t figure out how to get the whole article. Keep up the good work! Charlie

  9. After reading your bio, I wonder how you are able to find a happy medium between offering generalized advice that you know people will use in their own personal situation and providing specific financial advice at UBS. Do you feel it de-values the work you do with UBS at all?

  10. You requested DJIA P/E Ratios for the last 30 years at http://www.djindexes.com. We tried to respond to JLP@gt.rr.com, but received an error message when emailing this address. Please contact us again at djindexsupport@dowjones.com

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